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OUR STORY

Xander & Lexie

Xander & Lexie

A family venture, where we all worked together to make our dreams come true. From 2012 to 2020 we operated an alpaca farm and vegetable gardens. We had our son and his wife as well as our grandson as part of the farmer's team. In 2019 a decision was made........... we will downsize the farm operation while continuing to work the alpaca fibre.

We put a plan of action together and started on our new path in early 2020. We decided to put the farm and the alpaca herd for sale. As of August the herd was re-homed and the farm was sold.

The time had come for us to find the ideal place to continue the second part of our dream.... work the fibre!

We went on a house hunt and within a few weeks, we found our new homestead! This property offers everything we need to establish our fibre studio, workshop and store front. We will be established at this new location as of October 2020!

So our story continues................ stay tune for updates! 

 

2013 news ... Alpaca farm dream come true for Espanola couple - CBC News

Lina Godard and her husband own Dare 2 Dream Alpaca Farm & Sandy Loam Produce in Espanola. (Lina Godard/Supplied)
An Espanola couple say they are living a dream life by raising alpacas and growing produce. In 2012, Lina Godard and her husband purchased Dare 2 Dream Alpaca Farm and Sandy Loam Produce. They started their venture with five alpacas. Today, the couple has a total of 34 animals — with another two being born this week and two more alpacas on the way. “My husband and myself have dreamed of being farmers for a long time,” she said. But they worried about caring for large farm animals and how difficult it would be to care for them in the future.

Dare 2 Dream Alpaca Farm & Sandy Loam Produce in Espanola is currently home to 34 alpacas. (Lina Godard/Supplied)

“We’re not that young anymore. So through our readings, we came across alpacas — and the size of the alpaca is what intrigued us.” The animals are sheared once a year, usually in May, Godard said. “Alpaca fibre does not have lanolin, therefore, that scratchy feeling that you may get out of wool, they don’t carry,” she said. Once they’re sheared, Godard sends the material to a mill to be processed, before being sold as a yarn at farmer’s markets. Godard said the animals are "quite simple" to care for, but adds they are known to spit at one another. “Occasionally, you get caught in the cross-spit,” she said with a laugh.

About four acres of produce are also produced on the farm, including beans, peas, carrots, corn and potatoes. “Though it’s a lot of work … it is such a fulfilled feeling to be a part of this,” she said.
“We dared to dream, and we’re there. We’re living our dream.”
 

 

 

Papa and Xander

Papa and Xander

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Sakki

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Brock and Nutmeg

Updated September 06, 2020